Amazon.com: Casino Royale (9798693495296): Fleming, Ian: Books

Question about Book Availability

Hello, i am from Portugal and i have a question, why is it so hard to find a copy of Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale Hardcover(in English)? I tried Amazon Spain, UK, Germany, and they are all sold out. Ebay is the same. Even local bookshops here in Portugal do not have it :(
submitted by Lasglamil to JamesBond [link] [comments]

505 books to read in quarantine for people who are bored af

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Kasimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
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505 Books to Read in Quarantine If You’re Bored and Kinda Like Books (in No Particular Order)

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to cleanagers [link] [comments]

505 Books to Read in Quarantine

(Sorry for spelling mistakes)
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
Night by Elie Wiesel
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd
1984 by George Orwell
Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Green Mile by Stephen King
The Odyssey by Homer
Holes by Louis Sachar
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver
Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor E. Frankel
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
The Stand by Stephen King
The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Kushiel’s Dart by Jacqueline Carey
Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
The Divine Comedy by Dante
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy
Animal Farm by George Orwell
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy
The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Pet Sematary by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
The Long Walk by Richard Bachman
Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
The Stranger by Albert Camus
What If? By Randall Monroe
The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
100 Years of Solitude by Garcia Marquez
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut
Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock
11/22/63 by Stephen King
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
The Giver by Lois Lowry
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling
The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
Factfulness by Hans Rosling
Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo
Fugitive Pieces by Anne Michaels
A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
The Life of Pi by Yann Martel
The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
East of Eden by John Steinbeck
Between the World and Me by Ta-Nahisi Coates
A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
The Bible
The Choice by Edith Eder
Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Phantastes by George MacDonald
Macbeth by William Shakespeare
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
On Liberty by John Mill
Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith
The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank
The Once and Future King by T.H. White
Dracula by Bram Stoker
The Journals of Lewis and Clark
The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
The 33 Strategies of War by Robert Greene
Stuart Little by E.B. White
Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder
Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
A Time to Kill by John Grisham
The Pearl by John Steinbeck
Confessions by Kanae Minato
Rain on Me by Jack Pierce and Lotus Token
Took by Mary Downing Hahn
The Unwanted by Kien Nguyen
The Long Exile by Melanie McGrath
John Dies at the End by David Wong
Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom
The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan
The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
Dune by Frank Herbert
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson
Emma by Jane Austen
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Vertigo by W.G. Sebald
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates
The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
It by Stephen King
The Dinner by Herman Koch
The Metamorphosis by Frank Kafka
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
The Magic Kingdom by Stanley Elkin
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie
You by Caroline Kepnes
The Test by Sylvain Neuvel
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Dafoe
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Carrie by Stephen King
Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? By Phillip K. Dick
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
The Martian by Andy Weir
The Color Purple by Alice Walker
The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
Watership Down by Richard Adams
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Lacroux
King Lear by William Shakespeare
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Les Miserables by Víctor Hugo
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty
Misery by Stephen King
The Stepford Wives by Ira Gaines
Murphy by Samuel Beckett
The Girls by Lori Lansens
Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng
The 7 ½ Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton
The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger
One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Wicked by Gregory Maguire
127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston
Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
Room by Emma Donoghue
Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
The Tempest by William Shakespeare
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
Battle Royale by Koushun Takami
The Woman in the Window by A.J. Finn
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones
The Tattooist of Auschwitz by Heather Morris
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Galápagos by Kurt Vonnegut
The Shining by Stephen King
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
The Iliad by Homer
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
World War Z by Max Brooks
Becoming by Michelle Obama
The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson
The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan
Madame Curie by Eve Curie
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch
The Foundation by Isaac Asimov
A Man Called Ove by Fredrick Backman
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
The Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Matilda by Roald Dahl
The Glass Castle by Jeannette Wells
Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon
Looking for Alaska by John Green
Paper Towns by John Green
Gangster Redemption by Larry Lawton
Catch Me if You Can by Frank Abagnale
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Beloved by Toni Morrison
Cinder by Marissa Meyer
The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates
The Sun Does Shine by Anthony Ray Hinton
An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
The Underground Railroad by Carson Whitehead
The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
Wild by Cheryl Strayed
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
Light in August by William Faulkner
The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton
Sula by Toni Morrison
Fall On Your Knees by Ann-Marie MacDonald
House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Drowning Ruth by Christina Schwarz
A Map of the World by Jane Hamilton
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Rapture of Canaan by Sheri Reynolds
Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan
Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
Cane by Jean Troomer
Divergent by Veronica Roth
The Maze Runner by James Dashner
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli
Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
The Lion, the Witch, And the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Víctor Hugo
Because of Winn-Dixie by Kate DiCamillo
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck by Mark Manson
The Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman
You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero
Watchmen by Alan Moore
Maus by Art Speigelman
The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
Interview With the Vampire by Anne Rice
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Godfather by Mario Puzo
Breakfast at Tiffany’s by Truman Capote
The Arabian Nights
The Trial by Frank Kafka
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren
Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou
Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne
Aesop’s Fables
Middlemarch by George Eliot
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally
The Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
The Children of Men by P.D. James
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
Trainspotting by Irvine Walsh
1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Turn of the Screw by Henry James
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
At the Mountains of Madness by H.P. Lovecraft
Dr. No by Ian Fleming
The 39 Steps by John Buchan
Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon
The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie
Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett
Black Dahlia by James Ellroy
Fifty Shades of Gray by E.L. James
Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu
Death in Venice by Thomas Mann
One of Us is Lying by Karen McManus
Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
Night and Day by Virginia Woolf
The Third Man by Graham Greene
Requiem for a Dream by Hubert Selby Jr.
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater by Kurt Vonnegut
Who Moved My Cheese? By Spencer Johnson
Utopia by Thomas Moore
The Tin Drum by Gunter Grass
The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan
Trust Me by Lesley Pearce
Gone by Michael Grant
The House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
God is Dead by Ron Currie Jr.
Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Mein Kampf by Adolf Hitler
We by Yevgeny Zamyatin
13 Reasons Why by Brian Yorkey
The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
A Little History of the World by Ernst Gombrich
The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North
The Princess Bride by William Goldman
At the Earth’s Core by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Seventh Day by Yu Hua
Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah
The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien
Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz
Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
Twilight by Stephenie Meyer
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Killer Inside Me by Jim Thompson
Salt, Sugar, and Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss
The Man Who Owned Vermont by Bret Lott
Lamb by Christopher Moore
Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close by Jonathon Safran Foer
Doctor Doolittle by Hugh Lofting
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
Gulliver’s Travels by Johnathon Swift
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
Beowulf by J. Lesslie Hall
A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Common Sense by Thomas Paine
Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Pretty Little Liars by Sara Shepherd
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
The Story of My Life by Helen Keller
The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Dubliners by James Joyce
White Fang by Jack London
Roots by Alex Haley
Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
Othello by William Shakespeare
From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne
The Wendigo by Algernon Blackwood
Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
The Crucible by Arthur Miller
A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams
The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
Magna Carta by John, King of England and Stephen Langton
The U.S. Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman, and Robert R. Livingston
The U.S. Constitution by James Madison
The Articles of Confederation by John Dickinson
The Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln
The Koran
The Torah
His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman
Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
Atonement by Ian McEwan
A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
James and the Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Steig Larsson
The Help by Kathryn Stockett
The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
Eragon by Christopher Paolini
The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks
My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs
The Host by Stephanie Meyer
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weinberger
If I Stay by Gayle Forman
Freakonomics by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner
Wonder by R.J. Palacio
The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Ann Brashares
Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss
How the Grinch Stole Christmas! By Dr. Seuss
The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss
Uglies by Scott Westerfield
Educated by Tara Westover
Dear John by Nicholas Sparks
The Shack by William P. Young
The Gunslinger by Stephen King
Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
Where’d You Go, Bernadette? By Maria Semple
Marley & Me by John Grogan
An Abundance of Katherines by John Green
To All the Boys I’ve Ever Loved Before by Jenny Han
Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafazi
The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
The BFG by Roald Dahl
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Gaines
Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Seuss
I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore
The Witches by Roald Dahl
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown
1st to Die by James Patterson
Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams
V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd
The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
Under the Dome by Stephen King
If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff
Killing Floor by Lee Child
The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
The Brief, Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles
The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Absolutely True DIary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt
Cujo by Stephen King
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt
Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg
The World According to Garp by John Irving
Batman: Year One by Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli
Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry B. Jenkins
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
Christine by Stephen King
Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
From the Mixed Up Files of Ms. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
Patriot Games by Tom Clancy
Death Note by Takeshi Obata and Tsugumi Ohba
Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman
submitted by sarcasticomens12 to booksuggestions [link] [comments]

The 'Retired James Bond' plot of Bond 25 is symptomatic of a bigger problem with how the creators see their character.

Obviously there has been a lot of press given to the news that Bond will not be 007 in the new Bond movie and that 007 will be a new black, female character. While I feel that it's a decision that is disrespectful to the source material and character without editorial justification, that is not what this post is about.
This post is about the inference of having yet another movie beginning with a dysfunctional Bond who's not functioning as an employee of HMSS; namely, the writers don't know how to write an functioning Bond in today's geopolitical, social, and technological environment.

The Bond character is a relic of a Cold-War, colonial, ethnocentric western perspective who existed in a world without mass surveillance, drones, satellites etc. When the character was created he naturally fitted at the cutting edge of a nation's home security; not the case in today's world.

If we look at the last number of Bond titles since the turn of the century we see that this is a recurring theme and problem with many of the original scripts.

Goldeneye (1995) Although there is mention from M about Bond being a relic from the Cold War and a dinosaur he is still used functionally though the villain eventually turns out to be a fellow secret serviceman and a former friend.

Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) Again Bond is allowed to function as a spy and weapon of HMSS and stop a global terrorist threat

The World Is Not Enough (1999) Bond is sent by M to investigate a known terrorist and prevents a global threat. He is a functioning member of HMSS and M reveals that he is the best that they have.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Die Another Day (2003)

And so it begins. Bond is captured at the beginning of the movie and traded in a prisoner swap. He is treated with suspicion on his return and eventually has to go rogue to escape his own employers and prove his innocence, thus preventing a global threat.

Casino Royal (2006) A faithful adaption of the Ian Fleming novel has Bond as a (barely) functioning, useful member of HMSS using all of his skills to prevent a global threat.

Quantum of Solace (2008) Bond goes rogue again and goes off on a personal vendetta mission to avenge Vesper's death, inadvertently stumbling upon an international global threat and preventing it.

Skyfall (2012) Bond gets shot by his own team at the beginning of the movie and ends up dropping of the grid and disappearing from active duty. Much of the rest of the movie is based on his physical failings and an attempt to stop a former secret agent with a personal grudge.

Spectre (2015) Bond carries out a rogue mission and is later suspended from active duty by HMSS. As a result, Bond ends up going rogue again and preventing a hostile takeover of the British secret service.

Bond 25 (2020) Bond is retired and is presumably set to be drawn back into the action for a personal reason or forced to go rogue to prevent Blofeld from committing some large scale act of terror.

_____________________________________________________________________

And so I ask, why do they find it so hard to write Bond as an effective tool for the British government in their international fight against global enemies? Why can't Bond go up against a Muslim extremist ala Jack Ryan in Amazon's recent series? Why can't he combat a North Korean enemy like he did in Die Another Day? Why can't he search for Russian double agents poisoning defectors? Why has the focus of Bond's missions and adversaries become so insular?

I think the scripts have lacked courage in recent years, and with the details I have from Bond 25 already (the return of Blofeld, another rogue Bond mission) I'm afraid that looks set to continue.

One last thing; If the character doesn't make sense for them anymore in our hyper connected world, why not set him back in the early 60s where he belongs? People have eaten up period pieces in recent years from Mad Men to Boardwalk Empire to The Americans, so why not bring Bond 26 back to Connery era where the character was originally set and give him his mojo back? Sebastian Faulks and Anthony Horowitz have done the same thing with the novels in recent years so the material is already there (Devil May Care is better than any Bond story of the past 25 years bar Casino Royale).

This wasn't meant to be such a diatribe. I heard a quote that "no one hates Star Wars like Star Wars fans" and I guess I'm a little bit like that with Bond in so far as I'm a huge fan and have watched all of the movies several times, and owned the collection on VHS, DVD, and now Blu Ray but I could probably count on one hand the films I think are genuinely classics. I just haven't been satisfied with a Bond movie since Casino Royale (and to a lesser extent Quantum of Solace) and I don't understand why they seem determined to keep making the same mistakes over and over again.

TL;DR All the Bond movies are the same now because they're trying to appeal to a global audience. Go back in time to the 1960s and start the Bond story again where he's relevant.
submitted by TheGreatHuman to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Mads interview in Russia Interesting...

Interviewer
What was it like to work with Hideo Kojima as opposed to Hollywood directors?
Mads
— Well, he’s very gentle and very open-minded to you. First of all, [he has a gigantic story board with every single shot in the scenes. (This is HIS graphic novel)the image of what he wants to do] We were there in a room with green screens dressed in a suit that’s green and a helmet with a camera on – super weird! We’re doing little scenes and we don’t know exactly what the story arch is because it’s going to be in a game and people can change that. But we act out every scene. Luckily, I wasn’t the only one in a green suit, everybody else was, too, so it’s cool.-
Interviewer
You know Tom Hardy – there’s this meme or joke that every director who manages to cast Tom Hardy wants to put a mask on his face. With your movies , directors tend to do something to your eyes – Monsieur Le Chiffre [Casino Royale], Rochefort [The Three Musketeers], Kaecilius [Doctor Strange], and now in this video game you also have these black oily circles around your eyes…
Mads
— There’s also my character called One Eye in Valhalla Rising.
Thoughts
(interesting, to point out the guy with the patch? Dont you think. Also they didnt mention his most recent movie Polar that launched on Netflix where he also wears a patch on his eye) lets not forget MG RISING Revengance who was a cyborg...with one eye covered with a band
Looks like Snake in movies, Raiden with title of Rising, Valhalla A heaven just need one more and hes perfect.
Summary.. Valhalla Rising. / Heaven Rising
-- In 11th-century Scandinavia, an [enslaved man] dubbed One Eye (Mads Mikkelsen) because of an old facial wound stages a violent uprising against those who imprisoned him. One Eye links up with Eirik (Ewan Stewart) and other Christian fanatics who aim to use their muscle to spread God's word. Headed for Jerusalem, One Eye and his shipmates must cope with crew infighting and attacks from the coastline. But the journey's challenges are only a harbinger of even greater brutality. --
Thoughts
(Enslaved Man, has one eye, old facial wound, stages violent uprising against those that imprisoned him, title valhalla isa heaven in another belief/world
Sounds very much like Grey fox. Also could be Venom with the facial wound.
Oils on his face In first appearance of the legendary solider, a ghost - sorrow.
Dam very interesting. Blurring the lines between games and movies. This casting is pretty good kojima
All a coincidence right?
----Christian fanatics who use [ Muscle ]to spread Gods word. Headed [going on a path] for Jerusalem[Heaven]---
(God's Kingdom on Earth is Jerusalem)
Your kingdom come your Will (Joy's Will) be done on earth as it is in heaven (Outer)
But metal gear has nothing to do with christianity? Sure.
SAM (GreyFox) the prophet. "Nuclear song"
Porter (A GateKeeper)
Bridges (Use two Connect 2 things)
SAMuel the Prophet was the last ruling judges in the Old Testament (The Old World)
He was told to Anoint (smear with oil)
Saul A War Fighter (Liquid) [Strong Dominant Gene]
To be the 1st King A (BB) by
THE BB (The Father God)
of Isreal ( who are his People/ MG fans)
and Later anointed David (Solid Snake) A young shepherd [Weak Recessive Gene]
and later by killing the enemy champion Goliath (Metal Gear)
Kojima is the (Sorrow) The Boss of Hell/Hades. Hes been in hades so long https://mobile.twitter.com/hideo_kojima_en/status/1158395216811872256?lang=en
https://mobile.twitter.com/hideo_kojima_en/status/1134740081695006722?lang=en
See the sunset, the day is ending, there's not pretending. (Soon it ends) I'll show you the real thing soon, I promise
This is perfect casting. From multiple perspectives. If you had one chance to create before you died what would you do to cement yourself? Use the novel you built for over 30 years and tie all your games together. Then do the biggest thing in history that made you legendary in the first place. Deceive your audience. Those that dont like metal gear are enchanted with this story clearly DS is MG and SH mixed, spirt or successor. His audience would buy it even if it was just a AAA Amazon prime game lol
His movies
[3 musketeers] movie Insert 3 Snake. Raiden, Grey Fox
[Dr.Strange] multiple dimensions, TPP, SurVive, but the icing. The first student that turned dark..
[Casino royale]
Le Chiffre (French: [lə ʃifʁ], "The Cypher" or "The Number") is a fictional character appearing in Ian Fleming's 1953 first James Bond novel, Casino Royale.
Zero , enough said. Game about connections
submitted by Lycovus to NeverBeGameOver [link] [comments]

Mads interview in Russia very interesting...

What was it like to work with Hideo Kojima as opposed to Hollywood directors?
— Well, he’s very gentle and very open-minded to you. First of all, [he has a gigantic story board with every single shot in the scenes. (This is HIS graphic novel)the image of what he wants to do] We were there in a room with green screens dressed in a suit that’s green and a helmet with a camera on – super weird! We’re doing little scenes and we don’t know exactly what the story arch is because it’s going to be in a game and people can change that. But we act out every scene. Luckily, I wasn’t the only one in a green suit, everybody else was, too, so it’s cool.-
You know Tom Hardy – there’s this meme or joke that every director who manages to cast Tom Hardy wants to put a mask on his face. With your movies , directors tend to do something to your eyes – Monsieur Le Chiffre [Casino Royale], Rochefort [The Three Musketeers], Kaecilius [Doctor Strange], and now in this video game you also have these black oily circles around your eyes…
— There’s also my character called One Eye in Valhalla Rising.
(interesting, to point out the guy with the patch? Dont you think. Also they didnt mention his most recent movie Polar that launched on Netflix where he also wears a patch on his eye) lets not forget MG RISING Revengance who was a cyborg...with one eye covered with a band
Looks like Snake in movies, Raiden with title of Rising, Valhalla A heaven just need one more and hes perfect.
Summary.. Valhalla Rising. / Heaven Rising
-- In 11th-century Scandinavia, an [enslaved man] dubbed One Eye (Mads Mikkelsen) because of an old facial wound stages a violent uprising against those who imprisoned him. One Eye links up with Eirik (Ewan Stewart) and other Christian fanatics who aim to use their muscle to spread God's word. Headed for Jerusalem, One Eye and his shipmates must cope with crew infighting and attacks from the coastline. But the journey's challenges are only a harbinger of even greater brutality. --
(Enslaved Man, has one eye, old facial wound, stages violent uprising against those that imprisoned him, title valhalla is a heaven in another belief/world
Sounds very much like Grey fox. Also could be Venom with the facial wound.
Oils on his face In first appearance of the legendary solider, a ghost - sorrow.
Dam very interesting. Blurring the lines between games and movies. This casting is pretty good kojima
All a coincidence right?
----Christian fanatics who use [ Muscle ]to spread Gods word. Headed [going on a path] towards Jerusalem[Heaven]---
(God's Kingdom on Earth Jerusalem. Your kingdom come your Will (Joy's Will) be done on earth as it is in heaven (Outer)
But metal gear has nothing to do with christianity? Sure.
SAM (GreyFox)
Porter (A GateKeeper)
Bridges (Use two Connect 2 things)
SAMuel the Prophet was the last ruling judges in the Old Testament (The Old World)
He was told to Anoint (smear with oil)
Saul A War Fighter (Liquid) [Strong Dominant Gene]
To be the 1st King A (BB) by
THE BB (The Father God)
of Isreal ( who are his People/ MG fans)
and Later anointed David (Solid Snake) A young shepherd [Weak Recessive Gene]
and later by killing the enemy champion Goliath (Metal Gear)
Kojima is the (Sorrow) The Boss of Hell/Hades. Hes been in hades so long https://mobile.twitter.com/hideo_kojima_en/status/1158395216811872256?lang=en
https://mobile.twitter.com/hideo_kojima_en/status/1134740081695006722?lang=en
See the sunset, the day is ending, there's not pretending. (Soon it ends) I'll show you the real thing soon, I promise
This is perfect casting. From multiple perspectives. If you had one chance to create before you died what would you do to cement yourself? Use the novel you built for over 30 years and tie all your games together. Then do the biggest thing in history that made you legendary in the first place. Deceive your audience. Those that dont like metal gear are enchanted with this story clearly DS is MG and SH mixed, spirt or successor. His audience would buy it even if it was just a AAA Amazon prime game lol
His movies
[3 musketeers] movie Insert 3 Snake. Raiden, Grey Fox
[Dr.Strange] multiple dimensions, TPP, SurVive, but the icing. The first student that turned dark..
[Casino royale]
Le Chiffre (French: [lə ʃifʁ], "The Cypher" or "The Number") is a fictional character appearing in Ian Fleming's 1953 first James Bond novel, Casino Royale.
Zero , enough said. A game about connections
submitted by Lycovus to SONSOFBRIDGES [link] [comments]

[Monthly Roleplay] This year's list of Rapture import requests are in, and must be voted on by the council.

Rules

• Everyone who comments is seen as a vocal council member, sharing their opinion or idea on how to handle a matter.
• The debates will begin on Sundays, and the debates will be open until Friday, with Saturday and Sunday being when the council members will vote on how to proceed.
• Feel free to ask if you have any questions, and tell me if I need to clarify something, as I will act as the neutral mediator of the debates.
• I'll try to make these as realistic as possible, touching on some topics that the council may have encountered while acting as Rapture's governing body.
• Feel free to PM me any suggestions or ideas you have for topics, or how to improve everyone's RP experience.

This Month's case

Council members, as I’m sure you know, there some materials that simply cannot be made or found down in Rapture, due to our geographic location in the Atlantic, as well as being constrained within the confines of the sea. Therefore, it is up to you to sort through the disputed Import Request forms collected this year. If a business owner in Rapture is in need of a single product, or a reoccurring shipment of a product, it is up to the council to decide if the risk is justified, or if the product should be allowed in at all, if Rapture Administration is unable to reach a conclusion.
If any of you are unaware, Rapture uses a facade company known as Scarlet Sovereign: Import and Export to ship things here. This only works because we redirect the ships to Rapture instead of remote locations (on the manifests) with poor infrastructure or low development, which won’t attract much suspicion if a ship doesn’t arrive. When a boat full of textiles hasn't shown up in Santa Teresa or Kovalam, not many questions will be asked. But the more of these shipments we do, and the more diverse they become, the greater risk there is of being discovered. You may have to be quite utilitarian with what you will allow. The Rapture Administration offices near the Welcome Center have done a pre-screening, of sorts, and have removed all requests that wouldn’t even be physically or practically possible with our current means. They've also pre-approved other requests for basic materials, like more wood, rubber, etcetera. During the past year, they’ve also tracked down how the post-screened requests could be fulfilled, and given price estimates to the parties involved. The following are the, for one reason or another, undecided requests, and it is up to the council to decide whether a request should be allowed or denied.
Request Number: #027-R

Filed By: De Milo Cosmetics

Resupply Frequency: Yearly

Request Description: 200kg of Cochineal (Dactylopius Coccus) insect larvae.

Justification: The scales of these insects can be ground up to make the most exquisite red tones for our cosmetic products. It is a versatile coloring, and it mixes well with other artificial dyes. We intend to use it to release our new Feminine Industrialist product line. It will be used in our lipsticks, rouge, nail polishes, and others. If our estimates are correct, 200kg should be enough for the year.

Notes from Rapture Administration: It is very unlikely that Cochineal could successfully be re-cultivated in Rapture in a self sustaining way on an industrial level, due to the extremely hot and dry conditions in which they live, as well as the fickleness of their reproductive cycles, which will only take place in Nopal Cactus fruit. These are conditions Rapture could attempt to accommodate, but for the time and money it would take, yearly shipments from the surface would be more financially feasible.
 
Request Number: #041-R

Filed By: The Rapture Zoo and Aquarium

Resupply Frequency: Single Shipment

Request Description: A pair of adolescent Bengal Tigers, male and female.

Justification: Construction has just finished on the tiger habitat in the zoo, and the last thing needed will be the animals themselves. We were already assured the council would have no trouble with this, and that we should be cleared to receive the animals. They will also play a part in a Retractable Claws and a Reflex Boost plasmid promotion campaign. A compatible male and female are preferred, so a cub or two can also be produced later for the zoo’s own marketing purposes.

Notes from Rapture Administration: This may be a tricky situation. A Rapture citizen, who was big game hunter on the surface, put us in touch with a number of poachers to do the job and catch the tigers alive. It would be easiest to ship the animals out of Kuakata, Bangladesh. The issues, however, lie within the severity of live animal trafficking and transportation laws in Asia. We can’t put “two live Bengal Tigers” on the manifest without close scrutiny on the ship’s departure and destination. The only options would be to attempt to sneak the tigers out and lie on the manifest, or find a different, less risky, route to Rapture. However, finding another route could take more time than the zoo is willing to wait.
 
Request Number: #089-R

Filed By: Le Marquis D’Epoque Franchise

Resupply Frequency: Single Shipment

Request Description: 250kg of cocaine, as well as an industrial supply of coca seeds.

Justification: The LMDE Franchise would like to begin carrying cocaine and cocaine products in our stores. Due to the libertarian standards of Rapture this should be no problem. We would like to procure 250 kg of cocaine as a “sampler” for our current locations, to give the consumers a chance to try our future product. The seeds of Erythroxylum Coca will be cultivated in a rented space in Ceres Green Growers. The other ingredients for the product can be purchased in Rapture.

Notes from Rapture Administration: In a twist of irony, this may be one of the easiest requests to fulfill. The 250kg of cocaine can be legally purchased in Peru, as well as the seeds. They could be sent to Costa Rica on the manifests, and pass through the Panama Canal, and be on the way to Rapture. The only thing that kept us from approving the request was the infamous reputation of this drug. While, according to Rapture’s laws and regulations, there really isn’t anything that states cocaine is illegal here, we felt it was best to leave it up to the council to have the final say on this, considering you represent the people of Rapture.
 
Request Number: #134-R

Filed By: Anemone Publishing and Printing

Resupply Frequency: Yearly

Request Description: The following books from the surface:

The Parasites, By Daphne Du Maurer
The Wall, By John Hersey
The Naked and the Dead, By Norman Mailer
East of Eden, By John Steinbeck
Casino Royale, Ian Fleming
Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury
Horton Hears a Who!, Dr Seuss
Liberalism and the Social Problem, Winston Churchill
Giovanni’s Room, James Baldwin
Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Truman Capote

Justification: Due to the slow nature of book writing, the flow of new reading material in Rapture is but a trickle. As much as we rely on and appreciate our authors, the rate at which work is produced and consumed has left a gaping abyss for Rapture’s bookish types. We’d like to apply for this shipment of books from the surface, and have a test run printing and selling them to distributors across the city. If it proves to be a successful venture, we’d like to begin a yearly or biannual delivery to Rapture (Consisting of books which have been pre-approved by the council of course). We have compiled the list above by talking to new arrivals to the city about what they’ve read lately, and would prefer a more concrete source of information if the book shipments continue.

Notes from Rapture Administration: It was debated heavily wether this request should be rejected or not. In Rapture’s early days, there were book imports of this nature, but after a while, Ryan dissuaded book stores from carrying these imports, and to instead focus on Rapture’s local authors. Some have argued that this cutting of competition has lead to our authors growing languid and composite. Perhaps this addition of more competition into the mix could give their engines a bit of a jump.
 
Request Number: #209-R

Filed By: Langford Research Labs

Resupply Frequency: Single Shipment

Request Description: Several fertile samples of Neonothopanus Gardneri and Panelluses Stipticus

Justification: Langford labs would like to formally request these samples in order to further enrich the diversity of the Arcadia garden complexes. These collected species will be used as the last touches on Arcadia’s latest addition. Dr. Julie Langford has proposed an idea of a “Midnight Meadow” to act as a more engaging night time incentive to encourage late night trips (and more ticket sales) to Arcadia. The Midnight Meadow would contain a wide array of bioluminescent plant life, even more exhilarating than the aquatic flora outside our windows. The majority of flowers, shrubs, and grasses have been created, using our advanced botanical ADAM technologies. There is a hitch in the plan, however. The meadow would also make use of some rotten logs we’ve had laying around, and they were to be used as a food source for the bioluminescent fungi we were making. The problem lies in that the fungus samples we have in Rapture won’t take up the proper plasmids in order to induce the glowing visage we’re aiming for.

Notes from Rapture Administration: It may prove difficult to retrieve the samples requested by Dr. Langford. The bioluminescent Panelluses Stipticus can be found in most regions of the North Eastern of the United States. Collecting this samples should be easy, but Neonothopanus Gardneri may be a bigger challenge. It can only be found deep within the depths of the Amazon. We could pay for an expedition to regions they are found, but there’s no guarantee they’d find any, and not much is known about this fungus, other than that it glows, so it could present unforeseen consequences by bringing it to Rapture.
 
Those were the disputed request forms that must be voted upon by the council. When deciding on these requests, there are many things you must keep in mind, and many perspectives to consider. You must keep in mind Rapture’s national security, the needs and wants of Rapture’s consumers, the desires of Rapture’s businesses, the safety of the requests, and more. The choice is up to you, as the people of Rapture trust your representation of their best interests. If you disagree with another council member with their say on one of the requests, be sure to civilly explain why you disagree, and propose your opinion in an objective manner.

Voting

Voting is now closed.
Do what's right for Rapture!

Results

There were a few ties with the voting, so there was a tiebreaker made between the Rapture Administration and myself, and this is the conclusion:
Cochineal: DENIED
Rapture Administration would be happy to bring a one time shipment of the larvae to Rapture, but there will be no reoccurring shipments. DeMilo Cosmetics could commission one of Rapture's many esteemed labs to genetically enhance the creatures, or find some other method of producing their dye.
Bengal Tigers: APPROVED
According to the council, the shipment of these animals to Rapture should pose no significant threat to the city, and the council will be keeping its word to the Rapture Zoo and Aquarium.
Cocaine: APPROVED
The council has decided that cocaine will be allowed in Rapture, and the seeds and cocaine will be shipped from Peru to fuel a new line of cocaine products which will soon be for sale.
Books: APPROVED
Anemone Publishing and Printing will receive type set manuscripts ready to print in Rapture. They will also begin receiveing a list of popular books, to make more solid requests in the future. However, the council has the right to veto any books that has been labeled as not fitting Rapture's standards.
Fungus Samples: CONFLICTED
The fungus sample originating from Brazil will to be costly to obtain from the surface. The other sample will be provided, as well as a large expansion to Rapture's present fungal spore reserves, to allow greater diversity in the work Langford Labs can accomplish.
~
Remember, Rapture's secrecy is our best security! Don't let the parasite find our Eden!
submitted by GlassPomegranate to Bioshock [link] [comments]

The Gentleman's Reading List #6: Fiction Week

Evening, gents! Hope you're having an easy and enjoyable week, this time around I thought we'd take a break from more serious material (#7 is gonna take some brainpower) to share some of our favorite fiction. Could be fun, I'm not really sure, maybe you guys like my regular non-fiction picks more - let's see.
Casino Royale by Ian Flemming
How could I not mention James Bond? The international man of mystery on Her Majesty's Secret Service is the quintessentially classic gentleman's gentleman. He's capable because he knows things, he's creative and he's very resourceful. Then most of the time he just binge drinks, chain smokes and eats chicken sandwiches. If you've never read a 007 book, you might as well start with the first: Casino Royale.
Flying Finish by Dick Francis
Dick Francis was a very distinguished man on his own, having once ridden the Queen Mother's horse in the Grand National race with a surprising twist. He writes mystery novels, mostly, that involve horse racing to some degree. I chose Flying Finish because the main character is a son of a lord who hates the elitism of his family and their life, so he joins the middle class. Very enjoyable read.
Why Call Them Back From Heaven by Clifford D Simak
Here's a pick I gotta include by one of the true legends of classic science fiction. WCTBFH tells the story of a world where everyone lives in poverty and squalor because all the world's money goes to the Forever Center: A corporation dedicated to curing death, who'll freeze you upon death to wake you up when they crack the secret of immortality. With a very sci-fi premise, WCTBFH has deeply religious and spiritual themes. Some characters have real trouble reconciling endless life with their relationship to God, others become devoted followers of the Center, and others get too close to the truth. It's a fantastic read, and not too long to get through in a weekend.
1984 by George Orwell
1984, or as I like to call it, Present Day Britain, should be a fairly familiar tale to most of us here. It's the story of a manipulative, invasive government that controls it's people with an automatic brainwashing method called doublethink, and cripples their thoughts with a gutted version of English called newspeak. There are microphones in every corner, cameras in every TV and a TV on every wall. Big Brother is always watching.
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
I can't let 1984 slide without also mentioning Brave New World, a book written in response to 1984 by one of Orwell's university professors, Aldous Huxley. He tells a story in stark contrast to 1984, but with haunting parallels. Instead of the government using fear and manipulation to keep it's people compliant, the world of Brave New World uses distraction, pleasure, a drug called Soma, and raises people from the womb with sleep hypnosis and drug mixtures to always be friendly and know their place. There were no marriages and no families. You could just ask someone for sex and they'd usually say yes, because everyone belongs to everyone else. Much like 1984, news and literature are heavily suppressed and education is severely stunted except for the chosen few who get to be 'alphas'.
Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk
What can I even say about Haunted? It's less a book to read and more of an experience to endure. It's a series of short stories, some of which might be true, that are told by people who answered an ad for a Writers' Retreat, wherein they... Well, shit gets wild. I'm not ashamed to say that some of what's in Haunted is truly, genuinely disturbing. On the book tour, Chuck recites one of the stories and has said that people have cried, puked, even fainted when they heard it. Some stories are very cool, though - like The Nightmare Box and Civil Twilight. Give it a go, it's a hell of a ride.
That's it from me for now, lads! Don't be shy, leave your own suggestions in the comments and I'll catch up with you guys soon. Happy reading!
submitted by IronPimpernel to GentlemenOnly [link] [comments]

Post-Christmas James Bond Giveaway (X-Post from r/books)

Well, it's that time of the year again. The day after Christmas (for some Redditors on the other side of the world, it may even be two days). The day when we take stock of our holiday hauls and decide what to do with the Dreamcast system our grandparents gave us because they thought it was just swell or the Red Ryder BB Gun that you'll inevitably use to shoot your eye out. But, I digress.
Reddit, I seem to have found myself in possession of an extra copy of Ian Fleming's 1953 James Bond book, Casino Royale. I was going to sell it on Amazon or try and return it to a store, but decided that I would try and put a smile on one lucky Redditor's face. So I will be giving that one away, free of charge.
But, what's the catch? I thought I would have some fun with this and turn it into a contest. All you need to do is come up with a plot synopsis for the next movie. Keep in mind that it can be as outrageous or as canon faithful as you would like. Whichever one either gets the most upvotes or I like the best, will win the book. I will choose a winner on Saturday night and PM the winner the same night. I will also let everyone know which one I picked at that time.
A picture of the book
Don't forget to upvote this for visibility. It is a self-post, so there is no karma-whoring here, just some good will toward men...or maybe even a woman.
TL;DR - My sister bought me a copy of Casino Royale that I already owned, so in the spirit of Christmas, I want to give it away. But to make it fun, it'll be through a contest.
submitted by theorangestreak to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Bond Movies Of The Week: "Unofficial Bond movies"

James Bond is the highest grossing franchise of all time.
It is a franchise that has following throughout the entire world.
The novels by Ian Fleming, became a global phenomenon. The franchise about 007 inspired many young authors to start writing books, to dream that one day they will act in a Bond movie, even to spoof the world's most famous agent. Throughout the 50 years of Bond we've seen many parodies of the Bond movies, and many movies that were inspired by the majesty's agent.
But 3 movies will always be remembered as the movies that are the "bastard child" of the franchise. Bond movies that are not actually Bond movies. Bond movies that did not had the support by MGM, and movies that are really controversial. (while we are at the subject of controversy I would like to mention that throughout the 50years of Bond as we know it, MGM had many issues with the rights of Bond, and there were couple of Bond movies that were never made, but these 3 actually made it).
It all starts in 1954 with the first ecranisation of Fleming's first novel about 007. Casino Royale starring Barry Nelson Jimmy/James Bond.
If you haven't seen this episode/movie than you can check it out on YouTube by simply clicking at this link.
The Daniel Craig and Nelson were not the only actors to portray Bond in a Bond movie called "Casino Royale". In 1967 a parody/comedy version of Fleming's novel even gets an Oscar nomination for the movie named "Casino Royale" and it has Peter Sellers, Ursula Anders, David Niven, Dalliah Lavi, Terence Cooper, and even Woody Allen playing the role of Mr. Bond. I know that this sounds crazy to you but in the movie it makes sense, so you should check that one out if you want to see the "official" James Bond parody.
The most famous "unofficial" (or non-MGM) Bond movie is Never Say Never Again, and it has the original James Bond, Sean Connery in the role that brought him fame- Agent 007. Unlike the previous 2 movies this is more of an actual James Bond movie than the both versions of Casino Royale.
This will be a special week for BMOTW series cause instead of one you get to rate 4 (!!) Bond movies.
In the comment section bellow leave your ratings for SkyFall, Casino Royale (1954), Casino Royale (1967), and Never Say Never Again.
You can also write your review and your thoughts about the 3 Bond movies of the week.
If you haven't seen the 3 "unofficial" Bond movies you can see Casino Royale (1954): here.
And you can purchase video/BluRay/DVD of Casino Royale (1967):
here, here, and here
For Never Say Never Again just click here, here, or here.
And now it's time to see how did you rate Quantum Of Solace last week:
# Rating Name of Movie
1. 9.5 Casino Royale (2006)
2. 9.2 GoldFinger
3. 8.7 GoldenEye
4. 8.6 Licence To Kill
5. 8.4 The Living Daylights
6. 8.2 From Russia With Love
7. 8.2 The Spy Who Loved Me
8. 8.2 Dr.No
9. 8.0 For Your Eyes Only
10. 7.8 ThunderBall
11. 7.6 On Her Majesty's Secret Service
12. 7.3 You Only Live Twice
13. 7.2 Live And Let Die
14. 6.2 Quantum Of Solace
15. 6.2 The Man With The Golden Gun
16. 5.6 The World Is Not Enough
17. 5.6 A View To A Kill
18. 5.6 Tomorrow Never Dies
19. 5.1 MoonRaker
20. 4.6 Octopussy
21. 4.2 Diamonds Are Forever
22. 2.3 Die Another Day
Kind of surprisingly but Quantum Of Solace with a score of 6,2 gets the (un)lucky 13th spot in the list.
Do you think that any of the last 4 movies in the series can make major stir ups in the list ? Are the "unofficial" Bond movies the worst? Is the newest Bond the best? Follow our threads to find out.
Note: If most of you haven't seen the 3 movies mentioned in the thread, and think that it will take longer than a week (for any reason) to see all 3 movies, we will have another BMOTW next week, if not next week we will have our grand BMOTW finale where we will see the final results of this series.
I hope that you are enjoying this series, and as always whatever you are doing stay safe and Bond on.
submitted by dragonsky to JamesBond [link] [comments]

Post-Christmas James Bond Giveaway

Well, it's that time of the year again. The day after Christmas (for some Redditors on the other side of the world, it may even be two days). The day when we take stock of our holiday hauls and decide what to do with the Dreamcast system our grandparents gave us because they thought it was just swell or the Red Ryder BB Gun that you'll inevitably use to shoot your eye out. But, I digress.
Reddit, I seem to have found myself in possession of an extra copy of Ian Fleming's 1953 James Bond book, Casino Royale. I was going to sell it on Amazon or try and return it to a store, but decided that I would try and put a smile on one lucky Redditor's face. So I will be giving that one away, free of charge.
But, what's the catch? I thought I would have some fun with this and turn it into a contest. All you need to do is come up with a plot synopsis for the next movie. Keep in mind that it can be as outrageous or as canon faithful as you would like. Whichever one either gets the most upvotes or I like the best, will win the book. I will choose a winner on Saturday night and PM the winner the same night. I will also let everyone know which one I picked at that time.
A picture of the book
Don't forget to upvote this for visibility. It is a self-post, so there is no karma-whoring here, just some good will toward men...or maybe even a woman.
TL;DR - My sister bought me a copy of Casino Royale that I already owned, so in the spirit of Christmas, I want to give it away. But to make it fun, it'll be through a contest.
submitted by theorangestreak to books [link] [comments]

Casino Royale (2006) - Official Trailer HD - YouTube Joanna Lumley reads Casino Royale by Ian Fleming - YouTube Casino Royale by Ian Fleming - YouTube Ian Fleming, Casino Royal. James Bond First Edition. - YouTube Casino Royale, Ian Fleming. First Edition, 1953. Peter ... CASINO ROYALE, les différentes adaptations du roman de Ian ... Wie James Bond begann - Ian Fleming & 007 im Casino Royale ... David Rintoul reads Casino Royale by Ian Fleming - YouTube Casino Royale by Ian Fleming - YouTube Dennis Calero and Ian Fleming's Casino Royale - YouTube

Amazon.de/musik: Fleming, Ian – Casino Royale jetzt kaufen. Bewertung, Casino Royale. Buy Casino Royale (James Bond 007) 01 by Fleming, Ian, Judd, Alan (ISBN: 9780099576853) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. James Bond: Casino Royale: Amazon.de: Fleming, Ian, Klüver, Anika, Pannen, Stephanie: Bücher Wählen Sie Ihre Cookie-Einstellungen Wir verwenden Cookies und ähnliche Tools, um Ihr Einkaufserlebnis zu verbessern, um unsere Dienste anzubieten, um zu verstehen, wie die Kunden unsere Dienste nutzen, damit wir Verbesserungen vornehmen können, und um Werbung anzuzeigen. I hadn't read any Fleming before Casino Royale, so the chance to start at the beginning was too good to miss. I must say it is very much of it's period which is part of it's charm in places and very uncomfortable reading in others. This Bond is no modern metrosexual and some of the ideas accepted as the norm back then are quite disturbing to a female reader in 2017. I thought it held up well ... Read Casino Royale; travel back to a time when French was the only international language; a time when Joseph Stalin and the Soviet NKVD represented a very real threat; a time when people feared that threat; and a time when the governments of the Free World had very real people on the payroll like Fleming's fictional James Bond to counter that threat. Perhaps you'll see the same things in it ... Hello, Sign in. Account & Lists Account Returns & Orders. Try

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Casino Royale (2006) - Official Trailer HD - YouTube

Casino Royale (2006) - Official Trailer HDCasino Royale is the twenty-first film in the Eon Productions James Bond film series and the first to star Daniel C... This is an abridged audiobook from 1994, first of three James Bond novels read by Joanna Lumley. It was originally published on two cassettes on BMG's Talkin... CASINO ROYAL est le roman qui a donné naissance au personnage de James Bond, le célèbre agent 007. Dans cet épisode, Michel Therrien vous livre ses impressio... Casino Royale, Ian Fleming. First Edition, 1953. London: Jonathan Cape, 1953. You can view our first edition of Casino Royale on our UK site here: http://www... The first of Ian Fleming's James Bond novels, and the first of a set of unabridged audiobooks narrated by David Rintoul. These sets were published on cassett... Introducing James Bond: charming, sophisticated, handsome, chillingly ruthless and licensed to kill. This, the first of Ian Fleming's tales of secret agent 0... #TopSecret: Wer waren die echten #007-#Geheimagenten? Gab es die bizarren Bond-Schurken wirklich? Existieren Vorbilder für die größenwahnsinnigen Bond-Gegner... First edition, first impression in an exceptionally bright jacket. Fleming (1908-1964) finished Casino Royale over the period of two months in early 1952, wh... We chat with artist Dennis Calero about his amazing graphic novel adaptation of Ian Fleming's Casino Royale. The graphic novel is a faithful adaptation of Fl... Title: Casino Royale Author: Ian Fleming Audiobook with subtitle Casino Royale is the first novel by the British author Ian Fleming. Published in 1953, it is...

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